Odontectomy

An impacted tooth is defined as a tooth that can not or will not erupt into its normal functioning positions. Most commonly impacted teeth from greater frequency to the least are mandibular 3rd molars, maxillary 3rd molars, maxillary cuspids, mandibular premolars. Odontectomy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures by oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

It requires extensive training, skill and experience to perform in an atraumatic fashion. According to P.P. Rood et al Turner Dental School Department of OMS, Manchester, surgical removal of an impacted tooth may result in damage to the nerves and may cause disabling anesthesia to name a few, the lip, gingiva and skin that are supplied by the nerves involved in the procedure. That is why careful planning and evaluation are first considered prior to the procedure, assessment of skills in performing the surgery and knowledge in handling possible post op complications.
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Comprehensive Oral Head and Neck Examination in Oral Cancer Detection

A comprehensive oral, head and neck examination is essential in detecting asymptomatic oral lesions and dysplasias and evaluating the possibilities of oral cavity cancer. It is essential to detect oral cancer as early possible, because treatment is more effective with higher success rates when instituted before the disease has spread (regional metastasis). In many instances, the clinical information obtained is invaluable in determining etiology and progression of the oral disease for which the patient is seeking treatment.
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Oral Cancer

Oral cancer is a silent killer that whose prevalence is ballooning in terms of its morbidity and mortality rate. The dentist must havean acceptably good background regarding this condition in order to detect the presence of this condition in the patient, to be able to refer and thus early diagnosis be made by specialists. Early diagnosis is the key for a favorable prognosis.
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Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinuses

With the current concept of the clinical scope of practice of the dental practitioner, where he or she is not just task to maintain the health of the gums and teeth of patients but of the entire oral cavity and its surrounding structures, it is utmost importance thatthe dentist must also be aware of malignant lesions involving the sinuses specially since the maxillary sinus is considered the largest among the three sinuses within the oral and maxillofacial region.
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Oral Cancer and Pre-Cancer

Cancer is a killer disease and oral cancer is no less than any other form or site of cancer. Early diagnosis of cancer implies earlier stage of disease and earlier treatment, hence a better survival and better quality of life for the patient. The dentistis in an important position to detect oral cancer early thus contributing significantly to the chain of treatment by instigating early intervention through his recognition of disease and early referral.
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Facial Swelling

Dental practitioners are sometimes confronted with patients presenting some form of facial swellings. At times the presenting signs and symptoms may be confusing for the clinician, which somehow the correct diagnosis may not be properly made by the examining practitioner. It is important that a proper diagnosis of facial swelling be made so that early identification and treatment of the disease process that brought about facial asymmetry be made.
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Ulcerative Lesions of the Oral and Maxillofacial Region

The recognition and diagnosis oral lesions is an essential part of any dental practice, regardless of scope. Ulcerative lesions of the oral and maxillofacial region are fairly common and run the gamut from benign nuisances such as the common aphthous to serious life threatening malignancies such as squamous cell carcinoma. Ulcerative conditions may arise as part of the continuum of vesiculobullous lesions, as a result of localized soft tissue trauma as a manifestation of systemic conditions or viral infections; as a response to allergy or reaction to chemotherapeutics; or as a result of a neoplastic process.
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Cystic Lesions of the Jaw

Cystic lesions associated with odontogenic tissues are relatively common in the jaws and oral cavity. There are multifarious types of cysts, thus a simple classification of the various types will guide us towards the comprehension of odontogenic and nonodotogenic cyst. The pathogenesis of odontogenic cysts is so relevant to our understanding of the development of cystic lesions.
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