Types of Dental Implants

Today, we have close to 700 different dental implant systems produced by at least 146 manufacturers located in all corners of the world. Many specialists in the dental profession have expressed their concern about the seemingly unstoppable avalanche of new implants. Alarm was raised about the quantitative issues and qualitative issues. Based on recent studies not all new implants are clinically documented. Questions were raised about the quality of all the new dental implants that were being marketed.

Different commercial systems are available and various implant configurations usually are found within each system. It should be stated that the types of implants discussed here are based on the accepted basic implant classification. These are:

Endosteal

  • Root Forms
  • Plate/blade Forms
  • Endodontic Stabilizers

Subperiosteal

  • Unilateral Subperiosteal Implants
  • Interdental Subperiosteal Implants
  • Total Subperiosteal Implants
  • Circumferential Subperiosteal Implants

Denture enhancing

  • Intramucosal Inserts

Endosteal Implants comprise broad category of dental implants. They are placed within fully or partially edentulous alveolar ridges with sufficient residual bone to accommodate the implant. Endosteal implant systems are commonly referred to as one-stage or two-stage.

Root Form implants are designed to resemble the shape of natural tooth root. They are usually circular in cross section. They can be threaded, smooth, stepped, parallel sided or tapered, with or without coating, with or without grooves or a vent, and can be joined to a wide variety of components for retention of a denture.

Plate/Blade Form dental implants' basic shape is similar to that of a metal plate. - dentalimplantscostguide.org Plate/Blade Form implants’ basic shape is similar to that of a metal plate. – dentalimplantscostguide.org

Plate/blade Form Dental Implants‘ basic shape is similar to that of a metal plate or blade in cross section. They have a combination of parallel and tapered side. They can be one stage or two stage modalities. They can be placed anywhere in the mandible or maxilla where there is sufficient bone.

Radiograph of endodontic stabilizer implants. - dentalimplantscostguide.org Radiograph of endodontic stabilizer implants. – dentalimplantscostguide.org

Endodontic Stabilizer Dental Implants differ from other endosteal implants in terms of functional application. Rather than providing additional abutment support for restorative dentistry, endodontic stabilizers are used to extend the functional length of an existing tooth root to improve its prognosis and its ability to support fixed bridge. They can be long, threaded posts that pass at least 5 mm beyond the apex of the tooth root.

Radiograph of a subperiosteal implant. - dentalimplantscostguide.org Radiograph of a subperiosteal implant. – dentalimplantscostguide.org
Subperiosteal Dental Implants are placed under the periosteum and against bone on the day of insertion, rather than within alveolar bone. They are used in cases of advanced alveolar resorption, in which the volume of the residual bone is insufficient for the insertion of an endosteal implant.

Unilateral Subperiosteal Implants are placed in severely resorbed premolar and molar areas of the mandible or maxilla, where there are no distal natural abutments.

Interdental Subperiosteal Implants are placed on severely resorbed edentulous are between remaining natural teeth.

Total Subperiosteal Implants are for patients who have lost all of their teeth in one arch.

Circumferential Subperiosteal Implants are used in cases in which several anterior teeth are still in position.

Radiograph showing Intramucosal Inserts on the maxilla. - dentalimplantscostguide.org Radiograph showing Intramucosal Inserts on the maxilla. – dentalimplantscostguide.org

Intramucosal Inserts differ in form, concept and function from other types. They are mushroom-shaped titanium that are attached to the tissue surface of a partial or complete removable denture in maxilla. They provide support but do not provide abutments.

More information

For more information about types of dental implants, please talk to your dentist. Remember, “There is no online material nor website that can substitute for professional advice.”

Written by:
Editorial
Dental Implants Cost Guide

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